Chemical engineering is underestimated

Chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology

Thank-you  📅 26.01.2013 01:48:50
Chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
I'm going to graduate this year and am considering studying chemistry.

However, I read here that you should be clear beforehand that you have to do a doctorate in chemistry. And I don't feel like doing that. Therefore I would like to study chemical engineering or chemical technology. But where exactly is the difference here?
I've heard that the dropout rate at CIW is over 50%. I am afraid that I will not be able to complete my studies. Can someone report their experiences with these courses here? How demanding is the course anyway? Do you really have to be a physics ace? (Fluid mechanics, thermodynamics I etc.)

Kind regards
Cautic  📅 26.01.2013 02:10:17
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
Thank you Schoen wrote:
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> However, I read here that you have already been in the
> It should be clear to do a PhD in chemistry
> must. And I don't feel like doing that.

That's true.

> Because of that
> I would like to be a chemical engineer
> Study chemical technology. But where exactly
> is the difference now?

There is actually no difference between chemical engineering and chemical technology. Process engineering would also be an option. Or did you now want to know the difference to chemistry?

> I heard that the dropout rate at CIW
> is over 50%. I'm scared of studying
> not being able to pack.

It is no different with pure chemistry.

> How demanding is the course anyway? Got to
> can you really be a physics ace?
> (Fluid dynamics, thermodynamics I etc.)

Not in my opinion. But you should also be very interested in technology, as that makes up the main part of the course. And again, technology is not physics!
Incidentally, thermodynamics is one of the chemical subjects.

Errare humanum est, sed in errare perseverare diabolicum.
Cautic  📅 26.01.2013 12:49:36
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
Applied chemistry is more or less one of the courses in the field of chemical engineering

Errare humanum est, sed in errare perseverare diabolicum.
Thank-you  📅 26.01.2013 18:11:00
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
Cautic wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thank you Schoen wrote:


> Between chemical engineering and
> There is actually no chemical technology
> Difference. Process engineering would also be there
> an option. Or did you want that now
> Know the difference to chemistry?

You guessed right.


> In my opinion not. But you should too
> bring a great interest in technology, because that
> makes up the main part of the course. And technology
> again is not physics!


Well, technical mechanics is also a branch of physics and has something to do with technology.

> Incidentally, thermodynamics are chemical
> Fan.

Not quite, as far as I know, there is technical thermodynamics (TD I) and chemical thermodynamics (TD II).

I would be interested in going through with my studies, but I have a strange feeling that I will not make it. Whenever I hear: "Higher math failure rate 70%, fluid dynamics 50%, etc." You start to doubt whether it is really the right thing for you.
Cautic  📅 26.01.2013 18:32:27
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
Thank you Schoen wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Well, technical mechanics is also a sub-area
> Physics and has something to do with technology.

Technical mechanics is a branch of technical physics So of course you need the basics of physics (which you will also learn during your studies), but it is something else than pure physics

> Not quite, as far as I know, there are
> technical thermodynamics (TD I) and chemical
> Thermodynamics (TD II).

Yes, you're right about that too

> I would be interested in studying
> to pull through, but something strange creeps me
> Feeling that I won't make it. always
> when I hear: "Higher math
> Failure rate 70%, fluid mechanics 50% etc. "Da
> one gets doubts whether it really is that
> Right for one is.

But you'd have to be just as afraid of chemistry The failure rate in mathematics for chemists is similarly high and especially some do not even pass the introductory lecture. In addition, there is also the question of how many pass the second or third attempt and that is certainly the most in some subjects

Errare humanum est, sed in errare perseverare diabolicum.
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
As a chemical engineer you have opportunities, for example in plant construction, process optimization ... You can now bombard you with technical terms that don't mean anything to you anyway ...

I met someone who works at Novartis. Earnings are decent and his fellow students were well accommodated. I have to say you find the job very comprehensive, don't forget that after studying there is also a job and you have to do that for a couple of decades ...
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
The question is: what do you want to do later? If you prefer to choose chemical engineering because you don't feel like doing a doctorate in pure chemistry, I think that's a very daring criterion. Can you even get enthusiastic about the subject? The high dropout rates do not necessarily always come from the high demands that are expected. Very often, especially in the last few years, more and more people have chosen the natural sciences because of the media pushing it. It is only during their studies that these people notice whether it is something for them or not. And with very many it was just the wrong choice. That is why I would not attach such great importance to the drop-out rates, especially since many students adorn themselves with them in order to present their subject as particularly difficult. Or why do you think why the drop-out rates are relatively low in subjects like medicine? These are quite demanding subjects, but most of the people who make it into the course are aware of what to expect.
Thank-you  📅 28.01.2013 16:40:28
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
Chilliespote wrote:
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> The question is: What do you want to do later? If you're more for
> You decide chemical engineering because you don't feel like doing a doctorate in pure chemistry> I consider that to be a very daring criterion.

Well, the nice thing about engineering is that you "just" have to be able to do it. You don't take all of your knowledge with you, just what you really need for your job. This is exactly why I have CIW in mind. Of course you shouldn't underestimate the degree.

> The high dropout rates do not always come from the high demands
> which are expected. Very often, especially in the last few years, more and more people have> opted for the natural sciences because it was so promoted in the media. Only> during their studies do these people notice whether it is something for them or not. And with very many> it was just the wrong choice. That is why I would not attach such great importance to the> drop-out rates, especially since many students adorn themselves with their subject
> as particularly difficult to depict. Or why do you think why in subjects like medicine> the drop-out rates are relatively low? These are quite demanding subjects, but> a large part of the people who make it into the course are aware of what to expect.

But if you consider that there are only high drop-out rates in engineering subjects (especially electrical engineering, computer science) (ok, physics also has high drop-out rates )
Cautic  📅 28.01.2013 16:43:45
Re: chemistry / chemical engineering / chemical technology
Thank you Schoen wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Well, the nice thing about engineering
> it is that you "just" have to be able to do it. Man
> does not take all of the knowledge with it, only
> what you really need for your job.
> That is exactly why I have CIW in mind, of course
> one shouldn't underestimate the degree.

This is nonsense. In every course you learn things that you no longer need later. It is the same in chemistry and no different in chemical engineering.

> But if you consider that it is only in the Ing.
> study subjects (especially electrical engineering, computer science)
> There are high drop-out rates (ok, physics also has high
> Dropout rates )

That too is nonsense, it is the same in the natural sciences (chemistry, biology, etc.). Incidentally, one of the highest dropout rates has philosophy

Errare humanum est, sed in errare perseverare diabolicum.