Eats lamb healthy

Is lamb healthy? 5 reasons to add lamb to your diet

  • The protein contained in lamb consists of essential amino acids that can only be obtained through our diet. Animal sources of protein such as lamb are considered "complete proteins" because they contain all of the essential amino acids. Other non-meat protein sources, such as vegetables, grains, and nuts, typically do not contain at least one or more essential amino acids. (13)

  • As a red meat, lamb naturally has much more iron than other sources of protein like chicken or fish. Since lamb is a source of animal iron, it also contains heme iron rather than the non-heme iron found in plants. Heme iron is the more absorbable form of iron, so eating red meat like lamb can help improve and prevent iron deficiency and symptoms of anemia.

  • How much more absorbable is the heme iron in lamb than non-heme vegetable iron? According to the National Institutes of Health, iron bioavailability is around 14 to 18 percent if someone eats a diet that contains significant amounts of meat, seafood, and vitamin C, which increases iron absorption. For vegetarians, the bioavailability of iron from their meatless diet is significantly lower at only 5 to 12 percent. (4)

  • The Dietary Office of the National Institute of Health estimates that between 1.5 and 15 percent of people in the United States are deficient in vitamin B12. (5) Other studies, such as one published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2000, suggest that this number may be even higher and that up to 39 percent of the population may be vitamin B12 deficient. (6) Lamb is a great source of B12 with just 300ml of lamb, which is just under half of most people's daily B12 needs.

  • But that's not all - lamb is also loaded with other important B vitamins, including vitamin B6, niacin (vitamin B3), riboflavin (vitamin B2), and pantothenic acid (vitamin B5). Vitamin B12, as well as these other B vitamins, support the proper functioning of our nervous system, and vitamin B12 ensures that the actual nerve cells are in a healthy state. (7) In case you are not entirely sure why the nervous system is so important, that system is essentially the body's electrical wiring that is responsible for the proper communication and functioning of the entire body.

  • As you can see from the nutritional information in this article, lamb is also loaded with immune-boosting zinc. This nutrient is found in all cells in our body and is vital for optimal immune health, wound healing, DNA and protein synthesis, and growth and development in children.

  • If you don't get enough zinc on a regular basis for immune health purposes, your immune system won't work the way it should have all kinds of health problems from colds to serious infections like pneumonia. Eating lamb and other zinc-rich foods can help keep zinc levels in a healthy place and boost the immune system as a whole. In addition, zinc helps to develop optimal senses of taste and smell (two important things when consuming delicious lamb).

  • Lamb does contain fat, but a significant proportion of that fat is made up of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. In fact, most cuts of lamb contain even more omega-3 fatty acids than beef. Many people are aware of the many benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, but not too many realize that lamb is a remarkable source of these healthy fatty acids.

  • Grass-fed lamb also provides conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to consumers. (9) CLA is the name for a group of chemicals found in the fatty acid called linoleic acid. Why is it so great that lamb contains this group of chemicals? For starters, CLA has been shown to aid in fat loss, improve muscle mass, and even shown in animal studies to be a potential cancer fighter (especially breast cancer) in humans. (10, 11, 12)

  • As a type of meat and especially as a red type of meat, lamb is loaded with vital protein. Just one serving of lamb contains over 23 grams of protein. Protein intake is important for everyone, but the more active you are, the more important it is to have enough protein in your diet. Protein does so much for the body, including providing it with slow burning, sustainable fuel. It also helps your body build, repair, and maintain muscle mass.

  • The protein contained in lamb consists of essential amino acids that can only be obtained through our diet. Animal sources of protein such as lamb are considered "complete proteins" because they contain all of the essential amino acids. Other non-meat protein sources, such as vegetables, grains, and nuts, typically do not contain at least one or more essential amino acids. (13)

  • As a red meat, lamb naturally has much more iron than other sources of protein like chicken or fish. Since lamb is a source of animal iron, it also contains heme iron rather than the non-heme iron found in plants. Heme iron is the more absorbable form of iron, so eating red meat like lamb can help improve and prevent iron deficiency and symptoms of anemia.

  • How much more absorbable is the heme iron in lamb than non-heme vegetable iron? According to the National Institutes of Health, iron bioavailability is around 14 to 18 percent if someone eats a diet that contains significant amounts of meat, seafood, and vitamin C, which increases iron absorption. For vegetarians, the bioavailability of iron from their meatless diet is significantly lower at only 5 to 12 percent. (4)

  • The Dietary Office of the National Institute of Health estimates that between 1.5 and 15 percent of people in the United States are deficient in vitamin B12. (5) Other studies, such as one published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2000, suggest that this number may be even higher and that up to 39 percent of the population may be vitamin B12 deficient. (6) Lamb is a great source of B12 with just 300ml of lamb, which is just under half of most people's daily B12 needs.

  • But that's not all - lamb is also loaded with other important B vitamins, including vitamin B6, niacin (vitamin B3), riboflavin (vitamin B2), and pantothenic acid (vitamin B5). Vitamin B12, as well as these other B vitamins, support the proper functioning of our nervous system, and vitamin B12 ensures that the actual nerve cells are in a healthy state. (7) In case you are not entirely sure why the nervous system is so important, that system is essentially the body's electrical wiring that is responsible for the proper communication and functioning of the entire body.

  • As you can see from the nutritional information in this article, lamb is also loaded with immune-boosting zinc. This nutrient is found in all cells in our body and is vital for optimal immune health, wound healing, DNA and protein synthesis, and growth and development in children.

  • If you don't get enough zinc on a regular basis for immune health purposes, your immune system won't work the way it should have all kinds of health problems from colds to serious infections like pneumonia. Eating lamb and other zinc-rich foods can help keep zinc levels in a healthy place and boost the immune system as a whole. In addition, zinc helps to develop optimal senses of taste and smell (two important things when consuming delicious lamb).

  • Lamb does contain fat, but a significant proportion of that fat is made up of anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids. In fact, most cuts of lamb contain even more omega-3 fatty acids than beef. Many people are aware of the many benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, but not too many realize that lamb is a remarkable source of these healthy fatty acids.

  • Grass-fed lamb also provides conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to consumers. (9) CLA is the name for a group of chemicals found in the fatty acid called linoleic acid. Why is it so great that lamb contains this group of chemicals? For starters, CLA has been shown to aid in fat loss, improve muscle mass, and even shown in animal studies to be a potential cancer fighter (especially breast cancer) in humans. (10, 11, 12)

  • As a type of meat and especially as a red type of meat, lamb is loaded with vital protein. Just one serving of lamb contains over 23 grams of protein. Protein intake is important for everyone, but the more active you are, the more important it is to have enough protein in your diet. Protein does so much for the body, including providing it with slow burning, sustainable fuel. It also helps your body build, repair, and maintain muscle mass.