How exactly were muskets

 - STONE LOCK - PERCUSSION LOCK - MUSKETS - PISTOLS -       You are here: KayserstuhlThe new world Historic firearms        

Historic firearms
At this point we only show pistols and muskets from the modern era up to around 1850.

Our product range
Our range includes elaborate high-quality replicas as well as beautiful, but inexpensive replicas of percussion and flintlock pistols.

Shooting Ability
We do not have any firearms in our range. The high-quality replicas are explicitly blurred weapons for historical representations and sophisticated decoration. The ignition opening is not drilled, so the weapon does not work. A skilled gunsmith can drill a hole in the ignition opening and have the musket checked by a fire department.

Firearms - A Brief History
Firearms came into use in Europe shortly after the development of black powder from 1324 with the "pot de fer" in Metz. As early as 1326 Walter de Milimete mentioned the use of black powder in vase guns of the English King Edward II. The first demonstrable use of firearms in Germany took place during the Eltz feud from 1331 to 1336 with arrow rifles. Initially, however, firearms were mainly used in static situations, mainly when defending fixed positions or during sieges. But soon the weapons became lighter (hand tube) or more mobile by mounting them on mounts and led to a completely new type of warfare.

Muzzle loader
The muzzle loader is the original form of the firearm. A typically smooth barrel is loaded with propellant and projectile through the muzzle. The rear end of the barrel is tightly locked and only has a small ignition hole through which a spark or jet of fire generated by means of a fuse (matchlock), flint (flintlock), wheel lock or primer (percussion weapon) ignites the propellant charge. Muzzle loading firearms are classically loaded with black powder and a lead bullet. In addition, a gunshot plaster is often used for sealing.

matchlock
The matchlock is one of the oldest trigger mechanisms for firearms. It was in use from the 15th to the 17th centuries. Matchlocks were used on arquebuses and muskets. The iron barrel of the matchlock rifle had an ignition hole on the side, which was connected to the chamber. There was a pan with fine powder on the outside of the ignition hole.
The pan often had a protective lid that had to be turned away to the side or flipped up before the shot. In the first matchlock rifles, the fuse was clamped in the fuse holder ("cock") and the smoldering end could be pressed onto the powder in the pan by means of a lever mechanism connected to the trigger. The burning powder in the pan ignited the propellant charge in the barrel through the ignition hole. 

On this page:
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LUNCHLOCK MUSKETS
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA FOR REENACTMENT AND COLLECTORS
Arquebus, 16th century
Europ. Matchlock musket
English matchlock musket
Yep Matchlock carabiner

BLUNDERBUSS MUSKETS
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA
Blunderbuss with a blued barrel
Blunderbuss with brass barrel
Doglock Blunderbuss musket

UK MUSKETS
STONE LOCK FRONT LOADER
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA FOR REENACTMENT AND COLLECTORS
Doglock Musket (1640)
Brown Bess Musket (1742)
East India Brown Bess (1795)
British Baker Rifle (1806)

GERMAN MUSKETS
STONE LOCK FRONT LOADER
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA FOR REENACTMENT AND COLLECTORS
Potsdam musket (1740)
Prussian musket M / 1801

FRENCH MUSKETS
STONE LOCK FRONT LOADER
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA FOR REENACTMENT AND COLLECTORS
French musket (1728/46)
Charleville musket (1766)
Charleville carbine (1777)

MORE MUSKETS
STONE LOCK FRONT LOADER
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA FOR REENACTMENT AND COLLECTORS
US Springfield Musket (1795)
Spanish musket (1752/57)

MUSKETS WITH PERCUSSION LOCK
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA FOR REENACTMENT AND COLLECTORS
North American trapper shotgun
Springfield 1842 musket
3-band Enfield Rifle (1853)
2-band Enfield Rifle (1856)

BAYONETS FOR MUSKETS
Springfield bayonet *
Brown Bess bayonet *
Enfield bayonet *
* including leather sheath

HISTORICAL PISTOLS
HIGH QUALITY REPLICA FOR REENACTMENT AND COLLECTORS
German Steinschl. Pistol, 18th century
Prussian cavalry pistol M1850
Prussian cavalry pistol, 1727
German wheel lock pistol, approx. 1620
Perk.pistole Birmingh., 1867
French perk pistol, approx. 1822

STONE LOCK PISTOLS
DECORATIVE REPLICATIONS
Flintlock pistol "Eagle I"
Flintlock pistol "Eagle II"
"Hawkins" flintlock pistol
Flintlock pistol
Type I flintlock pistol
Type II flintlock pistol
Type III flintlock pistol
Type IV flintlock pistol
Type V flintlock pistol
Type VI flintlock pistol
Type VII flintlock pistol
Two dueling pistols in a set

PERCUSSION GUNS
DECORATIVE REPRODUCTIONS
Percussion pistol "Forsyth" I
Percussion pistol "Forsyth" II
Percussion pistol

USEFUL ACCESSORIES
Powder bottle with a hunting motif
Powder horn with leather strap
Gun wall bracket type I
Gun wall bracket type II

FURTHER ARTICLES ARE CONSTANTLY IN PREPARATION

Picture above: animation of a flintlock pistol firing (source: Wikipedia)

     

Flintlock
The flintlock (also "French lock" or "battery lock") is a trigger mechanism for muzzle-loading firearms that ignites with a flint. The first preforms already existed in the 16th century (snap lock), but they worked very poorly. In the 17th century the system was improved and gradually gained acceptance because it wasn't quite as weather dependent as the matchlock and because you could always be ready to fire without using a match. From 1704 it had prevailed in all armies and almost completely displaced the matchlock. More on this in Wikipedia.
The flintlock was replaced by the percussion lock.

Percussion lock
Before firing, the percussion lock is equipped with an impact-sensitive ignition charge (usually a percussion cap). When the trigger is pulled, a cock, which is cocked before the shot, strikes the ignition charge, which then ignites the propellant charge, whereupon the shot breaks. One of the earliest designs of a percussion lock comes from Alexander John Forsyth, who patented his design in 1807. Instead of a primer, this lock had a horizontally rotating magazine with impact-sensitive explosive. With each turn, a certain amount of powder got into the ignition pan and was ignited when the shot was released by the tap.
More on this in Wikipedia.

        MUSKETS & ARKBUSES
REPLICA WITH LUNCH LOCK       Shooting Ability
Our high-quality muzzle-loading replicas are explicitly blurred weapons for historical representations and sophisticated decoration.
The ignition opening is not drilled, so the weapon does not work.
A skilled gunsmith can drill a hole in the ignition opening and have the musket checked by a fire department.      

Arquebus, 16th century
The arquebus was developed from the much more bulky and clumsy hook box.
As the shorter and significantly lighter twins of the muskets, arquebuses were also able to be used by riders and thus represented the forerunners of the carbine.
Arquebuses were fired using a matchlock. The accuracy of the arquebuses was relatively low, which is why they were fired at short range or massaged as a battery.
This replica of an arquebus has a shaft made of solid wood as well as a matchlock, trigger and a smooth barrel made of hardened steel. The rear sight and front sight are attached to the barrel.

Details:
Matchlock: Hardened steel
Rifle Stock: Oiled Rosewood
Total length: approx. 115 cm
Length of the gun barrel: approx. 71.5 cm
Weight: approx. 3.5 kg
Caliber: approx. 14.9 mm (.58)

  • Item no .: WS-2341000703
    Arquebus, 16th century

Price: € 579.90 *

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European matchlock musket, 16th century
This authentic replica of a European matchlock musket is ideal for re-enactment in the 16th and 17th centuries.
The matchlock musket was used in the Thirty Years' War, in early colonial wars, e.g. by buccaneers, but also in the English Civil War. The replica has a steel barrel with a cannonized muzzle and front sight. The oiled rosewood shaft has a decorative grain over its entire length. The lock corresponds to the original including the typical lever mechanism.

Details:
Matchlock: Hardened steel
Rifle Stock: Oiled Rosewood
Total length: approx. 153.0 cm
Weight: approx. 4.7 kg
Length of the gun barrel: approx. 114.0 cm
Caliber: .72

  • Item no .: WS-2341000701
    Blunderbuss musket with a blued barrel

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English matchlock musket
This replica of the so-called "Fishtail Matchlock Musket" has a steel barrel with a cannonized muzzle and front sight. The oiled hardwood stick has a decorative grain over its entire length. The lock corresponds to the original including the typical lever mechanism.
Weapons of this type enjoyed great popularity throughout Europe and were also used, for example, during the English Civil Wars. This beautiful musket is a replica in the Swedish style. The Swedish King Gustav Adolf was instrumental in the creation of this new, lighter weapon, even though he drew much of his inspiration from the Netherlands. Muskets of this type were also produced on a large scale in Germany.
Rifles with matchlocks were in use in European armies from the 15th to the 17th centuries as armament for musketeers.

Details:
Matchlock: Hardened steel
Rifle Stock: Oiled Rosewood
Total length: approx. 145.0 cm
Weight: approx. 4.9 kg
Length of the gun barrel: approx. 104.0 cm
Caliber: .75

  • Item no .: WS-2367105800
    English matchlock musket

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Japanese matchlock carabiner
In 1543, Europeans brought the matchlock mechanism to Japan, where it remained unchanged for about 300 years. The shaft of these muskets did not have a shoulder piece, but ended at the level of the cheek, which earned them the nickname "cheek shaft musket". Many different matchlock weapons were made in Japan, and matchlock gun making became a distinct handicraft, similar to sword making. The carbine was called "Bajoututu" or "Bajou", which translated means "horseback" and describes exactly what these weapons were used for; for shooting from the back of a horse.
We find two different types of locking in the Japanese matchlock. One consisted of a V-shaped spring, which was mounted on the outside of the lock plate, the other variant was the internal coil spring. As with this replica, most of the locks on the originals were made of brass. Iron locks are only found here and there. The powder pan has a movable cover made of brass, which protected the fine ignition powder as long as it was fired. The replica is very artfully designed. It has decorative brass applications on the barrel and a blued barrel inlaid with silver. The shaft is made of oiled rosewood. The carbine comes with a steel ramrod.

Details:
Matchlock: brass
Pan: hardened steel
Total length: approx. 75 cm
Length of the gun barrel: approx. 49 cm
Weight: approx. 2.0 kg
Caliber: .56

  • Item no .: WS-2341001400
    Japanese matchlock carabiner

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        BLUNDERBUSS MUSKETS WITH STONE LOCK
Blunderbuss / Tromblon / Espingole       

Above: Detail from the painting "Close quarter fighting in boat-to-boat action" by Benjamin West (born October 10, 1738 in Springfield, Pennsylvania, † March 11, 1820 in London)

       Shooting Ability
Our high-quality muzzle-loading replicas are explicitly blurred weapons for historical representations and sophisticated decoration.
The ignition opening is not drilled, so the weapon does not work.
A skilled gunsmith can drill a hole in the ignition opening and have the musket checked by a fire department.      

Blunderbuss musket with a blued barrel
The blunderbuss musket - also called blunderbuss, tromblon or espingole - is a muzzle-loading rifle with a short, funnel-shaped extended barrel. It is an early form of the shotgun or the muzzle loader. These rifles are generally of medium size, slightly smaller than most shoulder-mounted weapons, but larger than a pistol. Although the Blunderbuss musket has a butt, its dimensions suggest that it was actually not placed on the shoulder but on the hip during the shooting process. Since they needed a light, handy firearm, the soldiers of the cavalry as well as sailors and pirates were usually equipped with the Blunderbuss or the shorter Blunderbuss pistol (English Blunderbuss dragon pistol or dragon). The blunderbuss has a hardened flintlock. The shaft is made of oiled rosewood.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock
Barrel length: approx. 28.5 cm
Total length: approx. 65 cm
Weight: approx. 2.2 kg
Caliber: .72

  • Item no .: WS-2341000800
    Blunderbuss musket with a blued barrel

Price: SORRY, NO LONGER AVAILABLE

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Blunderbuss musket with brass barrel
The Blunderbuss musket is a muzzle loading rifle with a short, funnel-shaped extended barrel. It is an early form of the shotgun or the muzzle loader. These rifles are generally of medium size, slightly smaller than most shoulder-mounted weapons, but larger than a pistol. Although the Blunderbuss musket has a butt, its dimensions suggest that it was actually not placed on the shoulder but on the hip during the shooting process. Since they needed a light, handy firearm, the soldiers of the cavalry as well as sailors and pirates were usually equipped with the Blunderbuss or the shorter Blunderbuss pistol (English Blunderbuss dragon pistol or dragon).

Details:
Brass barrel
Hardened steel flintlock
Barrel length: approx. 38 cm
Total length: approx. 78.5 cm
Weight: approx. 2.7 kg
Caliber: .69

  • Item no .: WS-2367106700
    Blunderbuss musket with brass barrel

Price: SORRY, NO LONGER AVAILABLE

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Doglock Blunderbuss musket
The Blunderbuss musket - also known as a blunderbuss, tromblon or espingole - is a muzzle-loading rifle with a short, funnel-shaped extended barrel. It is an early form of the shotgun or the muzzle loader. These rifles are generally of medium size, slightly smaller than most shoulder-mounted weapons, but larger than a pistol. Since they needed a light, handy firearm, the soldiers of the cavalry as well as sailors and pirates were usually equipped with the blunderbuss.
This replica of a Blunderbuss musket has a dog lock with safety guard (dog) and a trigger guard made of steel. The barrel is made of brass. The artfully crafted shaft and piston are made of rosewood.

Details:
Material: rosewood, brass, steel
Total length: approx. 79 cm
Barrel length: approx. 41 cm
Weight: approx. 3.2 kg

  • Item no .: WS-2341001301
    Doglock Blunderbuss musket

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    Back to top      BRITISH MUSKETS - TOP QUALITY REPLICA
FRONT LOADER WITH ROCK LOCK       

Above: Detail from the painting "The Death of General Warren at the Battle of Bunker Hill" (1786) by John Trumbull (June 6, 1756 - November 10, 1843)

       Shooting Ability
Our high-quality muzzle-loading replicas are explicitly blurred weapons for historical representations and sophisticated decoration.
The ignition opening is not drilled, so the weapon does not work.
A skilled gunsmith can drill a hole in the ignition opening and have the musket checked by a fire department.      

English doglock musket (1640)
The doglock (dog lock) is a variation and early form of the flint lock. In contrast to the real flintlock, the dog type does not have a half-cocked positional position. It was developed around 1640 and mainly used in the second half of the 17th century. By around 1720, however, it was largely displaced by the actual stone castle.
The present musket is a reconstruction of an English doglock musket from 1640, which was made until around 1715. Doglock muskets were popular in the English colonies of the New World. They were very robust and reliable and were used on both sides in the American Revolutionary War for sixty years after the last musket was made.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock (dog type)
Wooden charging rod with steel cap
Barrel length: approx. 116.5 cm
Total length: approx. 157.0 cm
Weight: approx. 4.45 kg
Caliber: .75

  • Item no .: WS-2341000401
    English doglock musket (1640)

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British Brown Bess Musket 1st Model (1742)
Brown Bess is the name given to a range of flintlock infantry rifles used in the British military for over a century.
It is a muzzle-loader with a smooth barrel pinned to the shaft. Loading was a complicated procedure: the load consisted of paper balls wrapped around black powder and sub-caliber round balls. To load, you had to bite off the folded end of these paper cartridges with your teeth, then fill the powder pan of the lock and finally pour the rest of the powder into the barrel. Only then could the bullet with the paper be inserted into the barrel and crammed firmly onto the powder charge with the aid of the ramrod. There are several models of the Brownbess. With this musket we offer a replica of the first model in the version from 1742, the so-called First Model Brown Bess Musket, also called Long Land Brown Bess or Long Land Pattern. This weapon was the standard rifle of the British armed forces in the 2nd half of the 18th century and beyond and was involved in all fighting. Although a new model was developed in 1756, the First Model Brown Bess was actually still delivered to the armed forces, so that it was the predominant weapon during the Seven Years' War. Even after the war, muskets of this type were still in stock and, in addition to the new Short Land Musket, they were also used in the conflicts during the American Wars of Independence.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock
Steel ramrod
Total length: approx. 158.5 cm
Barrel length: approx. 117 cm
Weight: approx. 4.7 kg
Caliber: .62

  • Item no .: WS-2367105146
    British Brown Bess Musket 1st Model (1742)

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East India Pattern Brown Bess 3rd Model (1795)
In the early 1790s, the British decided to replace the Brown Bess Short Land Musket (New Pattern) with an improved version. The war against France, however, required a rapid increase in weapon production, so the newly planned version of the Brown Bess musket had to be abandoned before its introduction in favor of a more familiar weapon.
Instead, the 1795 East India Pattern (3rd model) Brown Bess Musket was introduced.
England produced millions of EIP Brown Bess muskets which were used extensively in Europe during the Coalition Wars and the Napoleonic Wars. In America, the EIP musket was the standard weapon used by British forces during the Second Revolutionary War of 1812.
This beautiful replica is amazingly close to the original: It has a smooth shaft made of wood, authentic barrel straps, brass and steel fittings, and a functional flintlock made of hardened steel.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock
Total length: approx. 140.0 cm
Barrel length: approx. 99.0 cm
Weight: approx. 3.95 kg
Caliber: .75

  • Item no .: WS-2367106200
    East India Pattern Brown Bess 3rd Model (1795)

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British Baker Rifle (1806) with flintlock
Here we offer a reproduction of the famous Baker Rifle with flintlock, recreated after a model from 1806. This rifle was used by the British sniper regiments (also riflemen, known for their green uniforms) during the Napoleonic Wars. The London gunsmith Ezekiel Baker was commissioned around 1798 to design a rifle for the Riflemen because the Prussian hunting rifles that had been used up until then had been felt to be too heavy. After a development time of approx. 2 years in which various models were tested, the Baker Rifle was finally created with a 76 cm long, seven-course barrel. The pulls gave the projectile a twist and thus increased the stability of the bullet's trajectory. This resulted in an almost unsurpassable range of up to 300m with high accuracy, which compensated for the disadvantage that the muzzle loader could only fire approx. 2-3 shots per minute.
For several decades, this weapon was not only used in the British sniper regiments, but was also used by many American and other British-backed battalions. The rifle has a simple folding visor and a large lock mechanism with a gooseneck cock. A twisted brass trigger guard and a plaster compartment closed with a brass plate in the piston testify that Baker's development was based on the Prussian hunting rifle. Bernard Cornwell, the famous author of the novel Sharpe's Rifles (The Snipers) also owns a faithful replica of this rifle.
A nice addition to any collection and an essential accessory for the reenactor of the time. The Baker Rifle is also available with a percussion lock under item number WS- 367105300.

Details:
Total length: approx. 160.0 cm
Weight: approx. 4.6 cm
Length of the barrel: approx. 119.0 cm
Caliber: .69

  • Item no .: WS-2367105301
    British Baker Rifle from 1806 with flintlock

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    Back to top      GERMAN MUSKETS - HIGH QUALITY REPLICA
FRONT LOADER WITH ROCK LOCK       Shooting Ability
Our high-quality muzzle-loading replicas are explicitly blurred weapons for historical representations and sophisticated decoration.
The ignition opening is not drilled, so the weapon does not work.
A skilled gunsmith can drill a hole in the ignition opening and have the musket checked by a fire department.      

Potsdam musket (1740) with flintlock
In Prussia, too, flintlock rifles were introduced around 1700, initially imported from other European countries, but later manufactured in the Royal Prussian rifle factory in Potsdam-Spandau. The model from 1740 was created in Potsdam at the same time as the reign of Frederick the Great, the Old Fritz, and was used by all Prussian regiments in the second half of the 18th century. The musket was the Prussian standard weapon of the Seven Years' War and was also used during the American Wars of Independence. Our authentic replica of the Potsdam musket from 1740 has all the special features of the original: The hardwood stock with a short comb has an integrated thumb notch. The brass fittings, nose cap and cover plate contrast attractively with the grain-rich wooden shaft. The battery cover is reinforced and the seamlessly hardened barrel is made of carbon steel. The thread on the lock is also modeled on the original perfectly.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock
Total length: approx. 142.0 cm
Weight: approx. 4.5 kg
Length of the barrel: approx. 102.0 cm
Caliber: .75

  • Item no .: WS-2367106100
    Potsdam musket (1740)

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Prussian flintlock musket M / 1801
The official name of this penultimate Prussian flintlock musket was M / 1801. Colloquially, however, it was and is only called the Nothardt rifle, because the Prussian captain Friedrich Magnus von Nothardt further developed the Prussian infantry rifle model 1780/87 and improved it in many ways. It weighed a whole kilogram less, had a smaller caliber, was shorter, and had less powder consumption and less recoil than its predecessor.
The M / 1801 was characterized by several improvements over its predecessor, the Prussian infantry rifle model 1780/87. The present replica is stamped "Potsdam" on the castle. The original probably came from 1805.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock with stamping Potsdam
Total length: approx. 144.5 cm
Weight: approx. 4.9 kg
Length of the barrel: approx. 105 cm
Caliber: .62

  • Item no .: WS-2341000108
    Prussian flintlock musket M / 1801

Price: SORRY, NO LONGER AVAILABLE

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    Back to top      FRENCH MUSKETS - HIGH QUALITY REPLICA
FRONT LOADER WITH ROCK LOCK       Shooting Ability
Our high-quality muzzle-loading replicas are explicitly blurred weapons for historical representations and sophisticated decoration.
The ignition opening is not drilled, so the weapon does not work.
A skilled gunsmith can drill a hole in the ignition opening and have the musket checked by a fire department.      

French musket, model 1728/46
After the invention of the flintlock at the beginning of the 17th century, muskets were increasingly equipped with the new technology and now far exceeded the previous models in terms of range and reliability. The French musketeers were also to be equipped with flintlock rifles, so that a flood of developments began in France at the turn of the century. The French infantry musket finally prevailed in 1717; it was in use in various variations for more than 120 years, from 1717 to 1840, and later became known as the Charleville musket. The model from 1728 and its successor from 1746 were used by almost all French troops during the Seven Years' War from 1754 to 1762, in which the two colonial powers France and Great Britain fought for supremacy in America. There were a total of three armories in which the 1728/1746 models were made: Charleville, Maubeuge, and St. Étienne. Since most of the production came from the arsenal in Saint-Étienne, the 1728 model was also called the St.-Étienne musket. Here we offer a beautiful replica of the 1728 model, equipped with all the features of the original: the steel flintlock and the steel ramrod are based on the historical model, as are the three races and the strong steel trigger.

Details:
Total length: approx. 160.0 cm
Weight: approx. 4.6 cm
Length of the barrel: approx. 119.0 cm
Caliber: .69

  • Item no .: WS-2341000103
    French musket, model 1728/46

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French Charleville musket (1766)
In 1763 France introduced a new infantry musket, which was replaced 3 years later by an improved, lighter version with a smaller lock and a ramrod with a button-shaped tip. The main French armory that produced the 1766 model was in Charleville, in the northeastern Champagne-Ardennes region. Tens of thousands of muskets of this model were made there for the French royal army. After being replaced by the model from 1770/71, the decommissioned weapons were still used extensively in the American War of Independence: in 1776 the ongoing war against Great Britain created an urgent need for muskets on the part of the American colonies. In the spring, by resolution of the Continental Congress, the MP Silas Deane was sent to France to solicit financial and material donations from its government. The French saw this as an opportunity to settle accounts with the British. They sided with the colonists and smuggled shiploads of muskets into America. Since France's official declaration of war on Great Britain did not take place until 1778, a sham body was founded to cover up the contraband to camouflage the active participation of the French state. In addition, false ports of destination were entered in the logbooks of the ships that transported these muskets to America. Due to the strong presence of England on the high seas, some French ships had to call at West Indian ports and unload their cargo there, which was then picked up by American ships.
When examining the numerous traditional muskets of French production with additional U.S. Marking, it was found that the 1766 model with a button-like ramrod end was predominantly represented. When the United States began mass-producing muskets for the army in 1795, the 1766 version was so well represented in the ranks of American troops that the very first custom model from the Springfield, Massachusetts arms factory was an exact copy of the 1766 Charleville musket was. Although in France the model from 1777 was issued to the regiments promptly, the 1766 version was still in use and remained in service with some French infantrymen until the Napoleonic era. This replica of a 1766 Charleville infantry musket is amazingly close to the original: its round barrel is forged from hardened carbon steel. It has a threaded tail screw. The lock is equipped with sturdy, durable springs and a case-hardened pan lid (battery) that sets off good sparks.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock
Total length: approx. 152.4 cm
Barrel length: approx. 113.6 cm
Weight: approx. 4.6 kg
Caliber: .69

  • Item no .: WS-2367106600
    French Charleville musket (1766)

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French Charleville carbine (1777)
French muzzle-loading carbine of the late 18th century, developed as a slimmer and shorter version of the Charleville musket, which was then the standard weapon of the infantry, for use in cavalry. Since the introduction of the Charleville musket in 1763, lighter carbine versions of all adapted models have been built, each for the same reason and for the same purpose. These carabiners contain a smaller-sized mechanism and a side-mounted linkage for suspension on a saddle. Both the musket and the carbine were in use in the 1820s. With the withdrawal of Napoleonic troops after 1812, an estimated 750,000 weapons of these types also fell in love with the German territories that were no longer occupied. The mechanism consists of a typical French snap-cock flintlock with a bronze powder pan and a slightly curved battery made of hardened carbon steel. The lock has a resting, charging and firing detent, the battery spring offers enough tension so that it does not open unintentionally.
One St.Etienne embossing after the historical place of production decorates the cock side of the lock. The body is made of oiled rosewood according to the original dimensions, the mechanism, barrel and ramrod are made of hardened steel, the trigger guard is made of brass. This carbine is a very nice replica for the re-enactment of the time after the French Revolution, the Napoleonic era and also e.g. the Battle of Waterloo.

Details:
Hardened steel flintlock
Steel ramrod
Total length: approx. 115 cm
Length of the barrel: approx. 77.5 cm (30.5 ")
Weight: approx. 3.8 kg
Inner barrel diameter (caliber): approx. 16 mm (.63 cal)

  • Item no .: WS-2341001611
    French Charleville carbine (1777)
    embossed with "St. Etienne"

Price: SORRY, NO LONGER AVAILABLE

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    Back to top      OTHER MUSKETS
FRONT LOADER WITH ROCK LOCK       Shooting Ability
Our high-quality muzzle-loading replicas are explicitly blurred weapons for historical representations and sophisticated decoration.
The ignition opening is not drilled, so the weapon does not work.
A skilled gunsmith can drill a hole in the ignition opening and have the musket checked by a fire department.      

Springfield Musket (1795) United States