What actually happens in the Bermuda Triangle

What is the Bermuda Triangle?

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What is the Bermuda Triangle?

The Bermuda Triangle is notorious for its frequent sea and air accidents. Tim from Starnberg am See asks what the Bermuda Triangle actually is.

The Bermuda Triangle is a marine area that lies in the western part of the North Atlantic between the Bermuda Islands in the north and Florida and Puerto Rico as the southwest and southeast corners.

The Bermuda Islands are located in the Atlantic Ocean and are a British crown colony that owes its name to its Spanish discoverer, Juan Bermúdez. The Bermuda Islands are coral limestone islands with a mild climate. The population lives mainly from year-round tourism.

Many ship and aircraft disasters have already taken place in the Bermuda Triangle. Since sometimes entire boats or large airplanes disappeared and neither dead nor wrecks could be recovered, many legends have been formed around the Bermuda Triangle.

Scientists explain these events, however, with the special conditions in this area. It is assumed that the methane gas lying in the sea floor is to blame for the disappearance of the ships and aircraft. The mathan gas is released by tremors in seaquakes and rises in huge methane bubbles. In the rising gas, the ships lose their buoyancy and sink.

Researchers and scientists have even relocated the legendary island kingdom of Atlantis to the Bermuda Triangle. A stone road was found there under the water.

But we cannot be sure whether the legendary island of Atlantis even existed. Researchers all over the world have relied for centuries on the statement of Plato, who reported in the fourth century BC that Atlantis sank into the sea within a day and night. But how do we know if the Greek philosopher didn't just make it up? All of his descriptions of the location of the island have so far not led to successful finds.

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