Is low voltage harmful

How dangerous is 5A at 12 V.

  • Can any of you tell me what the consequences of a contact with 12 V and 5A are ???
    When Google came what weird posts e.g. the socket power just tingles

    thanks

  • If the power supply unit supplies 12V and 5A, that doesn't mean that they will flow through you. 12V is actually not a problem if you don't even notice it.

  • no, not dangerous, still counts as protective extra-low voltage. naturally relates to the human body ... fires can also be started with small voltages.

    the problem with 230V is also not the pain, which I really don't find that incredibly impressive, but that it can lead to a cardiac arrest, even hours after the contact.
    the house network is not yet sufficient for massive burns.

  • I wouldn't stick my tongue to it

  • 12V voltage is not enough to overcome the skin resistance - so you don't notice anything.
    Electricity flows, of course, but you can't get a shock.
    From approx. 60V it is different, because the "dangerous" area begins.

    "Socket power" does indeed tingle - but not pleasantly!
    I once came across a transformer under load (HDD housing), and my arm twitched minutes later!

    The decisive factor is always the current that flows - it is set by the "consumer".
    In the event of a short circuit, the maximum current that the utility can deliver flows - with 230V that is many amps.

    However, low voltages can also be made "noticeable" with tricks - as a child I once built a Wagnerian hammer from Fischertechnik: an electromagnet is activated by a circuit and attracts a contact strap - this interrupts the supply of the magnet and the contact switches again. If you put the circuit across the doorknob, the person trying to enter the children's room will get a wipe
    With 12V it is harmless - kind of like a joke article shocker - but generates good radio interference.

  • yes with that you would have an alternating voltage again and you notice it because the muscle contraction is also controlled by it.

  • Great, you also notice electrostatic discharges ... ZACK! and then there is also a muscle contraction

  • if it is only dangerous from 60V I am frustrated, because when welding you only have a good 21 volts

    But you can feel that quite a lot (accidentally played the crowd.) At 400Ampere it hurts like hell.

  • if it is only dangerous from 60V I am frustrated, because when welding you only have a good 21 volts

    But you can feel that quite a lot (accidentally played the crowd.) At 400Ampere it hurts like hell.

    At 21V and 400A through your body, 8kW would have flowed. You would no longer be sitting in front of your PC, or you would no longer have your hands due to the burns

  • maybe not everything flowed over me.
    I am still there .

    Went through good work shoes, they hold back a lot

  • So at 21V, 42mA should have flowed to I = U / R.
    (Assumption of low normal skin resistance 500 Ohm, source Wiki)
    With high normal skin resistance it would be just 7mA.
    Wiki again:
    In contrast, in the event of accidents with direct current, currents of 300 mA can still be survived.

    The welding machine is not a constant current source (at 500 ohms you would need a full 200000V to push through 400A), but rather a voltage source.

    Of course, these are VERY rough estimates.
    Gloves, extremely sweaty hands, short distances through the body, etc. can of course change the resistance dramatically.
    And now I'm just assuming that the information on Wiki is correct, it doesn't always have to be the case.

    Just for the sake of interest:
    At 60V, between 20mA and 120mA flow.
    So it's not entirely safe either.
    At 12V it is between 4mA and 24mA.

  • The only immediate danger is evaporation of metal and the splash that can get in your eyes. You can now laugh about it when it doesn't happen to you anymore. I have glasses and what of them has bounced off (or even stuck) on solder and small metal fragments ...

  • So at 21V, 42mA should have flowed to I = U / R.
    (Assumption of low normal skin resistance 500 Ohm, source Wiki)
    With high normal skin resistance it would be just 7mA.
    Wiki again:
    In contrast, in the event of accidents with direct current, currents of 300 mA can still be survived.

    The welding machine is not a constant current source (at 500 ohms you would need a full 200000V to push through 400A), but rather a voltage source.

    Of course, these are VERY rough estimates.
    Gloves, extremely sweaty hands, short distances through the body, etc. can of course change the resistance dramatically.
    And now I'm just assuming that the information on Wiki is correct, it doesn't always have to be the case.

    Just for the sake of interest:
    At 60V, between 20mA and 120mA flow.
    So it's not entirely harmless.
    At 12V it is between 4mA and 24mA.

    Show all


    Errm, at about 25ma the letting go threshold is reached, and at 50ma you are almost certainly in the grave with alternating voltage ......... yes 500ohm are really nüscht
    I already had fun with 34V on the network, only went to the root of the finger, but ouch ouch

  • Really dangerous (where there are already many deaths) is welding in boilers (please don't ask me why exactly)


    Wiki again:
    In contrast, in the event of accidents with direct current, currents of 300 mA can still be survived.

    The welding machine is not a constant current source (at 500 ohms you would need a full 200000V to push through 400A), but rather a voltage source.

    Of course, these are VERY rough estimates.
    Gloves, extremely sweaty hands, short distances through the body, etc. can of course change the resistance dramatically.
    And now I'm just assuming that the information on Wiki is correct, it doesn't always have to be the case.

    Just for the sake of interest:
    At 60V, between 20mA and 120mA flow.
    So it's not entirely harmless.
    At 12V it is between 4mA and 24mA.

    Show all

    I have to honestly say "(almost) not a word" ", I'm unfortunately not an electrical engineer.

    Edit:

    Errm, at about 25ma the letting go threshold is reached, and at 50ma you are almost certainly in the grave with AC voltage ......... yes 500ohm are really nüscht
    I already had fun with 34V on the network, only went to the root of the finger, but ouch ouch

    There are many people who have survived a direct lightning strike (even more often)

  • it's not about who has survived what and why, but from what threshold one has the chance to no longer survive.

    Nobody said that if the protective low voltage is exceeded, a quasi instant heartbeat occurs, but from then on you can be more sure that you will get out safely.

  • because when welding you only have a good 21 volts

    Where did the value come from? Normal welding machines have significantly more when idling - more like up to 60V

    Really dangerous (where there are already many deaths) is welding in boilers (please don't ask me why exactly)

    Probably because they used a regular welder. For tank welding you need an appropriately approved welding device, which has a limited output voltage - I think they are 42V max.